Saturday, 9 February 2013

Military Surplus Online

Military Surplus Online Detail
In the decade since military surplus sales went online, a publicly traded company that runs the auctions, Liquidity Services, has generated more than a half-billion dollars for the U.S. Treasury, including $180 million in the last year alone.
It makes sense for the government to sell surplus through a contractor, who is responsible for storing and sorting — and disposing of things that don’t sell.
Items become surplus when military units shrink or are inactivated, when their missions change or when equipment becomes obsolete. In fiscal year 2011, units turned in property to the DLA that originally cost the government $28 billion.
Surplus can be turned in by units at most locations where U.S. troops train or deploy. Some is sold to foreign militaries. Scrap containing precious metals is recycled. Many items are sent to other parts of the government.
Military units, federal, state and local governments and some nonprofit organizations can requisition military surplus, which is listed on an electronic database, before it goes to auction. For example, a fire engine turned in a few years ago by the Navy at Sasebo, Japan, was shipped to the Army’s Fort Gordon, Ga., for $18,000, a fraction of the cost for a new vehicle.
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online
Military Surplus Online

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